About Chemical Engineering at U of T

U of T regularly ranks as the best university in Canada to study chemical engineering and offers one of the top programs in the world. In your upper years, you'll have a chance to participate in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering's Minors and Certificates, and explore the Department's eight research clusters: Biomolecular & Biomedical Engineering; Bioprocess Engineering; Chemical & Material Process Engineering; Environmental Science & Engineering; Informatics; Pulp & Paper; Surface & Interface Engineering; and Sustainable Energy.

In The News

Better bioprocessing: Meet Professor Nikolai DeMartini - From pulp and paper to biofuels, many industries are based on turning renewable biomass — trees, plants, food waste — into energy and green materials. But even though the primary feedstock of these industries is organic matter, inorganic contaminants such as salts and metals are commonly found in the fields and forests where these feedstocks... Read more »
Gisele Azimi partners up to transform steel industry - Professor Gisele Azimi from U of T’s departments of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry and Materials Science & Engineering has received $750,000 in funding from Tenova Goodfellow, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s Collaborative Research and Development Grant and the Ontario Centres of Excellence Voucher for Innovation and Productivity II Grant. The... Read more »
Scaling up safely: Meet Professor Ariel Chan - Whether they are producing medicines, plastics or fuels, chemical plants around the must be designed and operated in a way that is efficient, effective and most importantly, safe. Professor Ariel Chan (ChemE) is an expert in scaling up chemical manufacturing processes — from making millilitres in the lab to tonnes in the chemical plant —... Read more »
Building the ‘bark biorefinery’: Meet Professor Ning Yan - With 347 million hectares of forest land — about 9 per cent of the world’s total — Canada is a leader in forest products, from softwood lumber to newsprint. But many parts of the tree, such as bark, aren’t currently used for any product; they are either burned for energy or discarded. Professor Ning Yan... Read more »
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